Executive Leadership

It’s common to hear top executives discuss how they took someone’s advice and it paid off. But sometimes, leaders reject seemingly sound advice—and reap the rewards.

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The best listeners actually enjoy learning from others. They’re content to stay silent and take in what they hear—without interjecting their opinions or making “should” statements.

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Your employees have rights, but your organization must defend its reputation. That’s why you need clear social media policies and must keep abreast of decisions by the National Labor Relations Board.

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To mingle with strangers, start by seeing yourself as a marvelous host. Your job: to bring others into an engaging conversation.

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During the finals of the 2006 French Open tennis tournament, Roger Federer faced underdog Rafael Nadal. Playing at a very high level, Federer sought to make history by extending his string of big victories.

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As chief financial officer of Trex from 2008 to 2015, James Cline helped the struggling company regain its footing. Trex, which makes outdoor decks and railing, had faced red ink, bloated inventories and problems with product quality.

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In 2012, Best Buy’s best years were behind it. The retail chain faced declining market share due to Amazon and other discount competitors.

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Best-selling author Stephen King, who wrote The Running Man in a week, notes the common wisdom that the more people write, the less remarkable their works tend to be.

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Your No. 1 ritual should be: Use more rituals.

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Enlightened leaders don’t try to motivate everyone equally. They target their efforts for maximum impact.

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