• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

Executive Leadership

Convert your random thoughts into action points with a computerized journal.

{ 0 comments }

After he’d started a fast-growing publishing company in the late 1980s, Kirk Cheyfitz griped to his board chairman one day about a manager who wasn’t exactly a self-starter. Without missing a beat, the chairman urged Cheyfitz to fire the guy right away.

{ 0 comments }

Here’s a process for making ethical decisions. Run through this work sheet if you ever feel queasy about the path you or your organization is about to take.

{ 0 comments }

Don’t view your network as a one-way street.

{ 0 comments }

Wegmans Food Markets recently clinched the #1 spot on Fortune’s “100 Best Companies to Work For” list, after making the list eight times in the past. It turns out that Robert Wegman’s success comes from a renegade philosophy, applied consistently for more than five decades: “Employees come first, customers come second.”

{ 1 comment }

Maybe you’d prefer not to compete, compete, compete. That’s what Alexandra McGilloway decided, so her business model is based on collaboration and complementary products rather than competition. In 14 years, East West has become the largest spiritual bookstore in the Northwest. Last year, it took in $1.7 million, about 5 percent more than in 2003.

{ 0 comments }

Make it a habit to grill your people about stories in the newspaper.

{ 0 comments }

View your decisions as a trial judge might:

{ 0 comments }

Tap into the young minds on your staff

{ 0 comments }

Ask your vendors to tell you how they can charge you less.

{ 0 comments }