Executive Leadership

Leaders see opportunity in every adversity. The cure may well outlast the disease.

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Like Gideon in biblical times and Coretta Scott King in our own, actor
Michael J. Fox wasn’t exactly thrilled about his call to leadership. Famous for playing boyish roles in Back to the Future movies and the TV show Family Ties, Fox never would have begun championing research on Parkinson’s disease if he hadn’t been diagnosed with it himself at age 30.

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It wasn’t merely Lawrence Summers’ perceived arrogance and abrasiveness
that sank his presidency at Harvard University. Large structural
changes in higher education—including the rise of science and
technology—also contributed to his downfall. Here are a few actions Summers could have taken to shore up his standing:

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Build trust among your people by stressing the seriousness of the problems that lie ahead of them.

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Check your listening skills by … having your hearing tested.

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A survey for a forthcoming book, Business at the Speed of Molasses,
found that people feel more motivation, energy and enthusiasm if they
think their employer’s core values are “crucial and part of everything
we do.” Here are 9 questions to test the strength of your team’s belief in your organization’s core values:

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Duke University’s legendary basketball coach, Mike Krzyzewski, mixes
traditional male coaching approaches with a feminine style he calls
“releasing your inner woman.”

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Realize more of your ambitions by attacking them with this conviction:

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Help your people understand the complexities of an issue

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Stay focused on key initiatives by identifying between three and five battles that are critical to your success right now.

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