Executive Leadership

When black singer Sam Cooke toured England in the 1960s, he spoke with
music critics about his songwriting, the music business and the history
of rock ‘n’ roll.

{ 0 comments }

The success story of Dan Mintz’s advertising agency in China is one of patience and persistence. But above all, it’s about guanxi (gwan-she), or building relationships.

{ 0 comments }

New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick has won the Super Bowl
three times despite working in a league structured to discourage
football dynasties. At least in part, he does it by:

{ 0 comments }

Bernie Sanders, the independent congressman running for an open Senate
seat in Vermont, certainly holds unconventional—some would say
career-killing—views as a democratic socialist. But the voters keep
sending him back to Washington because of these three traits:

{ 0 comments }

As a sideman in countless acts before hitting it big, guitar god Jimi
Hendrix was so unassuming that he could pester blues masters like
Albert King about how they bent the guitar strings to produce a certain
sound. The stars gladly shared trade secrets, never guessing how fast
Hendrix would surpass them.

{ 0 comments }

Grab an edge in negotiations by sneaking a peek at your opponent’s desk.

{ 0 comments }

A recent McKinsey study of the world’s most profitable megacorporations
finds that their achievements are made possible by some shared
leadership outlooks and practices.

{ 0 comments }

The way basketball player Nancy Lieberman tells it, her first visit to
a tennis “workout” for Martina Navratilova went something like this:
Hit a few balls, talk to a few people, hit a few lobs, go home. Lieberman could see that the tennis star lacked mental toughness and self-discipline. But with the right approach, Lieberman thought, Navratilova could become the greatest player ever.

{ 0 comments }

What should you do when one of your most trusted people produces
substandard results on an important project or initiative? Before you
start playing the “blame game,” take these steps:

{ 0 comments }

Winston Churchill, Great Britain’s prime minister during World War II,
never gave pep talks. Even when the tide turned in the Allies’ favor,
Churchill warned about the dangers ahead.

{ 0 comments }