Executive Leadership

Take a lesson in clear, concise communication from Gen. Ulysses S.
Grant’s last letters to Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

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To show the power of action, motivational speaker Jack Canfield will hold up a $100 bill during his seminars. “Who wants this $100 bill?” he’ll ask.

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Spare yourself the stress of thinking you can turn around troubled team members in only a meeting or two.

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Energize your team with a quick meeting each Monday morning.

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The “economy of force” principle is simple: Use your power skillfully
and prudently so that you reserve your maximum force for the point of
decision. Case history: Early in World
War II, when England suddenly stood alone against the Nazis, Adolf
Hitler figured he could squeeze the U.K. to death.

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Start your creative juices flowing by finding a quiet place and reserving it exclusively for thinking.

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Manage your expectations of newly formed teams with this Zen adage in mind:

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Stand out from the pack of capable colleagues

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Starbucks founder Howard Schultz credits leadership guru Warren Bennis
with teaching him that becoming a great leader requires recognizing the
skills and characteristics you don’t have and hiring people who do have
them. “Best advice” from other leaders:

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John Rutter is a renowned composer and conductor based in England. Although he’s sunny in both disposition and musical inflection, he also
sets rigid requirements and usually manages to elicit a more powerful
performance than even the chorus members thought possible.

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