Executive Leadership

Start your creative juices flowing by finding a quiet place and reserving it exclusively for thinking.

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Manage your expectations of newly formed teams with this Zen adage in mind:

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Stand out from the pack of capable colleagues

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Starbucks founder Howard Schultz credits leadership guru Warren Bennis
with teaching him that becoming a great leader requires recognizing the
skills and characteristics you don’t have and hiring people who do have
them. “Best advice” from other leaders:

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John Rutter is a renowned composer and conductor based in England. Although he’s sunny in both disposition and musical inflection, he also
sets rigid requirements and usually manages to elicit a more powerful
performance than even the chorus members thought possible.

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The gentle, highly paid Marshall Goldsmith says leaders “are waking up to the new reality that they can’t be SOBs and get away with it.” If you think you can improve yourself, here are Goldsmith’s four golden
rules, at a lower rate than the $17,000 per gig he usually charges:

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Roslyn Courtney used to think leaders were aloof. What she discovered
is that the best ones are down-to-earth, approachable, open and frank. “There shouldn’t be this mentality that the big, important person is on
top and the little people are on the bottom,” says the researcher. Here are some other characteristics Courtney has pinpointed in leaders:

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Although Native Americans in the late 19th century were fighting a
losing battle, they still enjoyed moments of leadership. This is one of
them.

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When Kevin Rollins took over as chief executive at Dell last year, he arrived just in time to see profits begin to slump. Rollins could’ve blamed a saturated marketplace or other external
factors. Instead, he decided that poor management was to blame. In a
gutsy upside-down move to shake things up, he asked employees to review
their bosses’ performance.

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Most leaders think they need to flaunt some grand vision to win over
employees, but it ain’t necessarily so, says Tom Davenport, author of Human Capital.

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