Executive Leadership

Mary Kay Ash was devastated after her husband died. But the cosmetics
queen had a big conference coming up, so she did what she’d always done
in the face of personal problems: She put on her best face, went out
and led her team.

{ 0 comments }

This psychological test of small business chiefs, called the Test of
Attentional and Interpersonal Style (TAIS), also works with big
corporations, the military and Olympic athletes. See how you compare:

{ 0 comments }

The jazz composer and orchestra leader Duke Ellington was born only 34
years after the 1865 emancipation of slaves. His father worked first as
a butler at the White House and later as a blueprint maker for the U.S.
Navy.

{ 0 comments }

Paul McDermott moved up from a high-volume producer in commercial real estate to a vice president at Freddie Mac. Along the way to becoming an executive, he learned a most important lesson:

{ 0 comments }

Do you resemble a Roman or Greek leader?

{ 0 comments }

Ever hear of Internet time? It’s kind of like dog years: Each calendar year equals six Web years.

{ 0 comments }

Heed AFLAC CEO Daniel Amos, who credits his success to a very simple philosophy:

{ 0 comments }

Grow as a leader by remembering that alibis are justifications you give yourself for failing to act on important issues.

{ 0 comments }

 Whenever you can, build immortal works.

{ 0 comments }

Polish your reputation as a big-picture person by breaking your responses to questions into distinct sections

{ 0 comments }