Executive Leadership

If you like to understand your own world through a parallel universe, the new management book Kingdomality divides
the leaders of a mythical medieval kingdom into four main personality
types, all of which are vital to running the place. The four:

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Arguably the most inspiring coach of all time, Vince Lombardi turned the also-ran Green Bay Packers into a football dynasty. Fortunately, Lombardi was not shy about expressing his leadership
philosophy, which comes across strong and clear in these quotes:

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Sometimes, you just have to manufacture an opportunity … even when it’s sitting right there in front of you. That’s the story of Michele Hoskins, a single mother of three who had
read that the 1980s was to be the “decade of the woman” and knew she
wanted to strike out on her own but didn’t even know what an
entrepreneur was. She had to look it up in the dictionary.

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Lack of candor can destroy your credibility. Perfect example: When former
NFL player Pat Tillman died under fire in Afghanistan, his
fellow soldiers knew almost immediately that they’d killed him by
mistake. But in a stupid attempt to look good, the Army shushed its
soldiers and told Tillman’s family that he’d died while storming a
hill, shouting orders to his Rangers.

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Procter & Gamble Chairman and CEO A.G. Lafley tells a tale of
getting down to core issues when a valuable employee wants to leave. It happened when Lafley once resigned from P&G. His boss, Steve Donovan, tore up the letter of resignation. “Go home,” Donovan told Lafley.

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Here is an abbreviated version of five practices that lay out the leader’s path:

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Tracy Rode always tries hard to comply with a client’s need for speed,
even if it means unrealistic deadlines under near-impossible
circumstances. Her particular challenge—and that of her company, Vision3 Interactive
in Nashville, Tenn.—is that online technology is evolving so fast that
it’s hard enough to keep up with technological advances without
over-the-top customer demands.

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Great leaders generally view fighting as a last resort. But most of them will fight, and fight furiously, once an adversary has pushed them to a point of no return. How do great leaders handle fighting, and how should you? Find some clues in the battle styles of these great presidents:

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Take two guys who’ve made it a big part of their “value proposition” to
hire military veterans, and you’ve got the basic leadership philosophy
at Home Depot. Vets are mature, disciplined leaders, says HR chief Dennis Donovan.

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At age 30, Dave Haynes has worked his way up from mowing lawns, driving
a bus and supervising water safety to become an international sales rep
for Federal Express. Now, he’s exploited his longtime status as a “grunt” in The Peon Book, a new guide for clueless bosses who forget what it’s like on the front lines. Haynes always thought business books “don’t ever give it to managers straight,” so, he wrote one himself. Some Peon highlights:

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