Executive Leadership

Sports legend Bobby Jones made up his mind in 1930 to do what no other person had ever done … or
has done since: Win all four major tournaments—the British Amateur, the
British Open, the U.S. Open and the U.S. Amateur—in the same year. Then, he figured, he’d quit, set up for life.

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Keep your mind sharp by feeding it new “software” to run.

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Some 100 years ago, Nellie Taft, first lady to President William Howard Taft, showed leadership in many ways, large and small.

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The best way to gain followers is to win their hearts, says leadership
guru John C. Maxwell. Use these eight tenets to do just that:

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If it seems inconceivable to you that Lewis “Scooter” Libby ever could
have outed an American spy and then lied to cover it up, consider this: He’s merely the latest example of a high-level operative caught in the
ancient trap of considering himself among the best and the brightest, a
tribe whose members think they don’t have to play by the rules…

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Two people on separate continents— one a Chinese doctor, the other a
Nigerian activist—have bucked tremendous pressure and scorn to lead
entire villages out of the despair and destruction of AIDS epidemics. Here are their stories:

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While even the best leaders aren’t perfect decision-makers, it’s still true that a wrong decision is different from a bad decision.

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Not content to write a one-paragraph mission statement for the lobby
wall, Michael Dell had his leadership team craft a document called “The
Soul of Dell.” It’s probably the longest statement of purpose an American corporation
has ever crafted, and it serves as an internal benchmark for operations.

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Surprise alone is not enough to defeat your opponent and win. But it can turn events in your favor. “Surprise,” Gen. Mark Clark once said, “is worth a thousand soldiers.” Case in point: the 1976 “Raid on Entebbe.”

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Being a steelworker on a big construction job is literally living on
the edge, and that’s right where Ugo “Hokey” Del Costello likes to be. “If I [screw] up,” says the project boss for the massive new Woodrow
Wilson Bridge that will connect Maryland and Virginia across the
Potomac River, “I could kill somebody.” Despite the extreme nature of his job, Del Costello is a leader in familiar ways:

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