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Executive Leadership

It’s a growing truth: The closer you are to the top, the more you’re in
danger of lacking for professional development, feedback, friendship,
recognition and praise. Regular praise and professional development often dry up near the top of the food chain.

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As Philadelphia Eagles fans “welcomed” him with a lusty chorus of boos,
newly drafted quarterback Donovan McNabb must have questioned his debut
to the National Football League. “I hadn’t even taken a snap and they were on me,” says the Eagles top
draft pick of 2000, whose selection die-hard Eagles fans, um, disagreed with.

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When the citizens of Richmond,Va., overwhelmingly decided to switch
from a “weak mayor” to a “strong mayor” government and picked former
Virginia Gov. Douglas Wilder to run it, he responded by pledging
allegiance to the city and nothing else.

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Don’t fall back on excuses— someone hasn’t returned a call or provided some data you need—for not finishing something.

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Resist the temptation to keep people who hate each other from working together.

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Allow your people to surprise you with their talent and ideas

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Reap the best return from available talent by limiting the number of people you assign to project teams.

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Add a little extra assurance when assigning an important project

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Use e-mail as Bill Gates does: to flatten the hierarchy in your department or organization.

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If work overload sometimes makes you feel as if you might have an adult version of attention deficit disorder (ADD) … you might. A psychiatrist studying this phenomenon calls it attention deficit trait (ADT). Some facts:

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