Executive Leadership

Late in the 1990s, NASA made a sobering discovery: Due to the departure
of key scientists, nobody on staff knew how to put a man on the moon. That’s why the space agency developed these seven critical questions to help stem the loss of critical knowledge:

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The pitcher may run the show in baseball, but the catcher often leads the pitcher. Take Brian Schneider, catcher for the Washington Nationals. Although he
has great physical skills, it’s Schneider’s finesse with pitchers that
makes him stand out.

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One day, leadership guru Jack Stack was fishing—and failing miserably
at it—when he noticed an old-timer standing nearby on the dock. Stack
asked the old guy what he (Stack) was doing wrong.

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Many executives fail to identify their most talented people. Usually,
that’s because they’ve placed too much trust in one of the following
assumptions:

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After combing through 14 years of research, here’s what Good to Great guy Jim Collins says about the art of making decisions:

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After the battles of Shiloh and Vicksburg, when Ulysses Grant had
developed fully as a general, he was called upon to resolve a crisis in
Tennessee, where Chattanooga had become a trap for Union forces. Grant’s decisions underscored his competence, in these ways:

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Adopt these principles, from leadership guru John C. Maxwell, to win over your people:

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Stay in tune with your people by refusing to multitask when someone pops in your office.

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Use a change in weather as an excuse to review your wardrobe.

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If you’re lucky, you’re leading a synergistic culture. That means
you’re pulling in the same direction as the people in the ranks. If you’re not lucky, you’re leading an antagonistic culture. That means you’re pushing outlooks that most of your people don’t value.

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