Executive Leadership

During the poisoned-Tylenol crisis of 1982, Johnson & Johnson
incurred a vast financial loss by asking stores to destroy their
Tylenol inventories. Compare J & J’s response to that of Johns-Manville Corp., which
refused for years to admit that the asbestos it produced was killing
people.

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Problem: Disaster-relief
agencies and the United Nations are flooded with donations to help the
victims of natural disasters, but none has a quick way—an army, say—to
deliver the supplies to where they belong.



Solution: The folks who brought you overnight shipping.

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Now that the first generation of leading black executives—a few of whom
worked their way up the ranks during the civil rights era—has retired,
they’ve begun sharing their wisdom with the rest of us. Clifton Wharton, the first black CEO of a large company (TIAACREF),
inherited that wisdom from a friend who told him there’s more than one
way to press for civil rights.

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Reach your career goals faster by setting aside time each day

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Visit their web sites periodically.

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Beware when renegotiating a deal that’s gone south.

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Set an example even while you’re on vacation.

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Build good will with your people by engaging them in personal chats.

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Actor Jamie Foxx endured plenty of hardship growing up, including
abandonment by his parents. But loving grandparents raised him and,
later, famous entertainers mentored him. His take on leadership:

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When Thomas Neff and James Citrin were interviewing 50 CEOs and company presidents for their book Lessons From the Top,
they decided they would ask all of them to name the greatest leadership
lesson they had learned from reading the books by Peter F. Drucker. Here are five lessons that topped the list:

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