Executive Leadership

Maintain your effectiveness as a leader by resisting the temptation to
flatter people, withhold information, lie or exaggerate past successes

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Encourage “break the mold thinking” by asking team members to interview
10 people outside your organization about the challenges you’re facing

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Break a negotiation deadlock by saying “In other words …,” then restating the other person’s position.

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Make better decisions by devoting more time to understanding the viewpoints of those who don’t agree with you

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It remains an irony and a mark of Chief Joseph’s leadership that,
although he carried no authority over anyone except his own small
tribe, everyone considered him the great chief of the prosperous
Northwest tribes known as the Nez Perce. Through broken treaties and broken promises, Joseph still stands as an icon of bravery, compassion and leadership.

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During its Golden Age 2,500 years ago the city/state of Athens created
democracy and produced some of the greatest art and architecture in
history, yet could rise to military excellence when threatened. Here are some ideas for leading your organization toward that kind of durable greatness:

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In 1953, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis played London’s Palladium, the
first appearance in England for what back then was America’s top
entertainment act. The Palladium audience loved them … except for a few anti-American
demonstrators in the balcony, who booed. The next day, several British
papers carried headlines that read, “Martin and Lewis Booed.”

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Leaders run a high risk of burnout as they move from one real-world challenge to the next. Stay strong by realizing that you need to continually learn and grow in three key areas:

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When William Nuti left his job as Cisco Systems’ senior vice president
in 2002 to take the helm of Symbol Technologies, board members warned
him that he’d be facing “issues.” But it was much worse than that.

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Herman Edwards, newly named head coach of the Kansas City Chiefs football team, always had leadership in his bones.

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