Executive Leadership

Expose potentially disruptive team behavior by watching how prospective team members play

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Help your people escape from job stressors by moving problem-solving conversations from the person’s work area to yours.

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These days, “nice”
is a leadership tool, especially in light of Enron-style accounting,
vanishing pensions, quarter-billion-dollar executive pay packages and
bloggers eager to report what it’s like to work at your organization. “Positive energy is the Holy Grail of business right now,” notes University of Michigan professor Kim Cameron.

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Confederate Motorcycles founder Matt Chambers builds minimalist,
high-tech motorcycles that sell for more than $55,000 and look like
carbon-fiber robots. Here’s the manifesto-like mission statement Chambers wrote to whip his
employees into a fanatical state of mind about his products:

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Years ago, the head of a big accounting firm hired an executive coach on his own dime. He wanted the arrangement kept secret. When the coach told the executive that their work might take awhile, the exec wanted to know what that meant. Two weeks? The coach smiled.

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Tom Peters loves employees who interrupt their bosses. He loves students who raise their hands at the “wrong” time. That’s because the management guru believes no assumption should go
unchallenged and no strange idea should be dismissed or ignored. He
praises leaders who have the guts to hire deviants and challenge the
status quo.

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In his methodical way, Arthur Berchin loves to win. As coach of this year’s academic decathlon team at William Howard Taft
High School in Woodland Hills, Calif., Berchin in April led the school
to its third national title. Here’s how Berchin does it:

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Thanks to breakthroughs in neuroscience, we can better understand how the brain works … and help your team outgrow bad habits.

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Upton Sinclair, best known for his muckraking books The Jungle and Oil!,
had such a winning personality that he ran for governor of California
in 1934. But it soon became apparent that what made “Uppy” a great man
did not make him a great candidate for the Democratic Party.

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Job-title inflation has been around for a long time, but it took off
during the dot-com boom, when companies handed out titles instead of
cash. Now, apparently, we’ve reached the point where “overtitling” has
led to inequities and overcompensation. But beware the solution hit on by Employco, an HR consulting firm and
insurance company in Illinois that decided it had to overhaul its job
titles, down-titling six senior staffers.

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