Executive Leadership

When looking for the next generation of leaders in your workplace, ask yourself these questions.

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It’s tempting to frame lots of things as the silver bullet. But with enough thought and study, you can identify a concept called “controlling insight” as that one thing.

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As a senior executive at Pepsi in 1992, Craig Weatherup realized his company’s core product—cola—was losing its luster. Years of lagging sales indicated that consumers’ interest had peaked and they weren’t going to buy more cola regardless of Pepsi’s marketing efforts …

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One CEO knew his employees needed a big lift after enduring a snowy and frigid winter. Read how his “Summer of Love” gave them a light at the end of the tunnel.

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When Daniel Lubetzky launched his own company in 2004, he also launched a personal mission: He wanted to build an organization based on kindness. Lubetzky has dedicated his company to inspiring others to live a kind life.

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To set a consistent strategy for her 300,000 employees at Hewlett-Packard, Meg Whitman requires that all her managers read a business book: Playing to Win by A.G. Lafley.

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As CEO of Prudential Group Insurance, Lori Fouche is one of the most powerful women in business. The 47-year-old credits her success in part to her ability to describe her leadership style succinctly.

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The story of how a Nabisco exec wowed senior management with her presentation on building the Life Savers brand is an excellent lesson in how to deliver a message.

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If you can get your managers to excel in these areas, you’re more apt to fill the pipeline of future leaders at your organization.

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Many leaders want to promote wellness in their workplace. But for Mark Bertolini, helping employees stay healthy is part of a deeply personal journey.

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