Executive Leadership

In the face of overwhelming change, it’s easy to see why senior managers retreat to mechanisms that help them avoid anxiety and discomfort. But those mechanisms, by definition, thwart leadership.

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Some CEOs talk more than they listen. They bark orders, tell self-aggrandizing stories and show off their knowledge. True leaders prefer to extract knowledge from others. They ask questions in a friendly, engaging manner.

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If you ask Doug Tieman to describe his leadership style, he’ll give you two answers. When he wants to inspire employees to excel, he sees himself as a cheerleader. But when crises erupt and he seeks to reassure an anxious workforce, he acts like a mule skinner.

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Ethical foundations are important in leadership positions. We interviewed the president and CEO of UBS, a large Swiss bank, to get his advice on how to build them.

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In 1998, Nancy Schlichting moved from Ohio to Michigan to take the CEO job at Henry Ford Health System (HFHS) in Detroit.  She knew it wouldn’t be easy.

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Every leader wants to run a harmonious workplace. But when personalities clash and tensions erupt, collaboration tends to fall by the wayside.

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There is no Svengali directing the career of Taylor Swift. She calls the shots.

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Carli Lloyd was sick of losing. At age 21, she considered quitting soccer after being cut from the U.S. under-21 team. “I’m a winner, and I want to go out there and win,” she said …

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A list of things to avoid in order to lead with courage.

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Figuring out how to set realistic goals has vexed leaders for a long time.

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