Executive Leadership

During the 2008-09 recession, Jim Goodnight of SAS didn’t just promise job security to his workforce. He also challenged them to use the slowdown to innovate. Housed on 300 acres in Cary, N.C., the tech giant’s campus offers its 14,000 em­ployees a chance to concentrate on ­creativity with a minimum of distractions.

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Like many CEOs, Dan Quiggle also raised funds for his favorite nonprofit organizations. He recalls asking a billionaire for a hefty donation to a particular charity. Quiggle, co-founder and CEO of America’s Choice Title Co., made his pitch with care. He began by thanking the billionaire for his support …

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Many leaders view “collaboration” as a way to get buy-in. That’s not collaboration. It’s about asking people their input up front, when what is done and how it’s done matter. It’s about using a team to distill the best ideas, not necessarily your ideas.

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Tom Clancy, best-selling author of military thrillers, proved that you don’t have to sneak around to glean intelligence.

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“I like a battle of ideas because I think the best will win,” says David Brain, president and chief executive of EPR Properties, and a leader more interested in the truth than being right.

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Tom Magliozzi, who died in November 2014, co-hosted the radio show “Car Talk” with his brother Ray. The two of them got away with a ton of cornball shtick because of their deep knowledge about why machines work.

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As a corporate executive, Jackie Barretta led many technology teams. Some of those employees feared for their jobs. In one team meeting, Barretta entered the room a few minutes early. Anxiety engulfed the group …

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There are at least five good reasons to involve your team in the hiring process.

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When you rise to the top of your organization, you may think you’re infallible. But just because you run the show doesn’t mean you know it all. The 43 American presidents can attest to that.

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Maybe it’s surprising that the CEO of ­Victoria’s Secret, a $6.7 billion global brand, grew up as a farm girl in Oklahoma. Maybe, but it shouldn’t be. The important thing about CEO Sharen Jester Turney is that she has the zest to try new things.

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