Executive Leadership

When leaders say that they’re going to do something, they follow through. But that’s especially hard if they promise to tackle a tough task.

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Better habits will up your game, but they take time to establish.

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Some leaders speak out about issues related to fairness and social justice. But only a few follow through.

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In 2005, Bob Rotella gave a pep talk to George Mason University’s basketball team. A sports psychologist, Rotella sought to spur the players to see themselves as champions.

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As CEO of Cleveland Clinic, Delos “Toby” Cosgrove had earned a sterling reputation as a longtime leader in the health care field. After gaining international fame as a pioneering heart surgeon, Cosgrove took the top job at the prestigious Cleveland Clinic in 2004.

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Always wanted to blog? Now is the time to get moving, with these ideas for your first few posts.

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In the three and a half years that Marissa Mayer has run Yahoo, many of her key executives have quit. In October 2015, Mayer implied that those who left Yahoo lacked certain skills.

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In the face of overwhelming change, it’s easy to see why senior managers retreat to mechanisms that help them avoid anxiety and discomfort. But those mechanisms, by definition, thwart leadership.

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Some CEOs talk more than they listen. They bark orders, tell self-aggrandizing stories and show off their knowledge. True leaders prefer to extract knowledge from others. They ask questions in a friendly, engaging manner.

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If you ask Doug Tieman to describe his leadership style, he’ll give you two answers. When he wants to inspire employees to excel, he sees himself as a cheerleader. But when crises erupt and he seeks to reassure an anxious workforce, he acts like a mule skinner.

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