Executive Leadership

You may be hiring the wrong way, says reputation management consultant Logan Chierotti. Your best bet may not be looking at résumés or cover letters.

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In late 2008, Domino’s market share was plummeting. Instead of blaming collapsing sales on the nation’s economic downturn, executives chose a surprising strategy: They admitted their main product—pizza—wasn’t very good. Then Patrick Doyle took it a step further.

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Social media have so many hidden features that it’s hard to keep up. Here’s one you may have missed.

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Many leaders urge employees to take responsibility and make smart decisions. But some leaders interfere by insisting on signing off on those decisions. By delegating well, you can push decision-­making down to the rank-and-file.

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In theory, strategic planning sounds great: You gather top thinkers in a room and brainstorm. But for Jim Estill, former CEO of Synnex Canada and now a partner in a venture capital firm, strategic thinking requires inspiration. He finds that it doesn’t happen on demand, so he lays the groundwork and stays attuned to insights that can arise at any time.

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The most motivated employees will respond by describing their overriding goal to make a life-changing impact on others.

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“Self-awareness,” is what entrepreneur Joel Trammell says is the most important skill a CEO needs. “It’s hard to get authentic information from your employees. CEOs are constantly worried that they’re not hearing the full story.”

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Curiosity is free, it’s a mindset you can de­­velop, and it’s the perfect antidote to uncertainty, says executive coach Sue Bethanis.

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In July 1945, 25-year-old Don Hornig babysat the atomic bomb. It was a nerve-wracking task, but he kept his cool. On the day before its first full-scale test, he and Robert Oppenheimer worried that lightning over the New Mexico desert might accidentally trigger the bomb prototype…

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Prioritizing your workday is easy when your job consists of a small handful of tasks. But for most of us, dozens of pressing issues jockey for our attention. Step back and assess what matters most. Treat your time as a finite resource and allocate every hour wisely.

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