Colette Carlson

Here are six common communication mistakes that people—especially professional women—make in the workplace, according to communications consultant and Business Management Daily contributor, Colette Carlson:

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Everyone is expected to do more with less and the only way we’re going to survive and thrive is to stop at 80% and then move to the next task.

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When you’re thrust into working environments, you deal with all sorts of people on a daily basis. If you don’t get along with some of them, the hours can drag on. If these people are your bosses, the days can seem like torture. Here’s how to manage your manager.

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Have you been taught to “sandwich” constructive criticism be­­tween two positive statements? I think this is a distasteful way of delivering feedback and here’s why:

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Personnel changes can occur quickly and abruptly. So it makes sense to obtain letters of recommendations before you need them.

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Being powerful doesn’t mean you’re brazen, pushy or trying to control anyone or anything. It simply means you stop focusing on how little power you have in a situation, and instead tap into your talent and determination to influence others to create better outcomes. Start using your skills to make your office or home better for everyone.

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Do you find yourself watching time pass and still not beginning—let alone completing—what you say you want? Well, there’s no magic formula that allows others to succeed while you don’t. It all boils down to daily discipline.

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Can you hear a colleague mention your name three cubicles over while in the middle of a task? If so, you can thank your Reticular Activating Center (RAS), which is similar to a big filter at the base of your brain. It’s up to you to program it for its highest and best use.

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Never before have decision-­makers looked more closely at their return on investment, but I believe the greatest return you will ever receive is from the investment you make in yourself. Here’s why:

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Some of us have had that un­­comfortable moment with a co-worker—an unwelcome ad­­vance, an inappropriate joke, or a colleague who just doesn’t seem to accept your consistent “no’s” to lunch or happy hour invitations. Here are five tips to fend off unwelcome behavior.

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