Business Management Daily

Company policies lay the foundation on which employment expectations are formed. There’s no time like the present to audit your organization’s policy handbook. Start by checking that your organization’s policies don’t fall into these four policy writing traps.

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Social media can be a tool to save you time and actually help your business. Here are five suggestions from OpenForum.com to get more out of it:

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With unemployment still running high, too many managers tell their employees—whether through their words or actions or both—that they should feel lucky to even have a job. “You need to nip that in the bud,” says attorney Shanti Atkins.

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As small businesses around the country plan for the rest of the year, many are focused on simply surviving. What’s lost is the big idea. During the research for my book, The Innovation Secrets of Steve Jobs, I asked technology analyst Tim Bajarin about lessons entrepreneurs can learn from Jobs’ success.

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Whether it’s a speedy way to create a bar chart or a trick for switching from one window to the next, keyboard shortcuts can help even the experienced admin knock out work faster. Here are a few of our readers’ faves:

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Remember Wal-Mart’s $640 million wage-and-hour mistake? That was all because of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The FLSA seems straightforward, but small compliance errors can add up to big penalties. Here are the basics you need to know to stay out of court:

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Sir Richard Branson, founder of the Virgin Group of more than 300 companies, encourages employers to look beyond their employees’ current roles. “Don’t always think of the switchboard operator as the switchboard operator,” says Branson.

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With some people, the problem isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. This can manifest itself in everything from quiet disobedience to outright insubordination. How should you respond?

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Congressional actions often grab the headlines, but recent executive branch moves have subtly expanded those who qualify for leave. Here’s what’s new and how you should comply…

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If a colleague tries to sabotage you in front of the group, here’s what you should do: 1. Don’t approach someone for a discussion until you can think rationally. 2. Immediately address issues. 3. Stand up for yourself in a professional manner. 4. Wrap up on a positive note. 5. Report back to your boss.

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