BMD Editors

Q. We have an annual off-site company party, with alcohol. We pay for half the hotel room cost if people want to stay over. An alleged harassment event occurred in a hotel room around 2 a.m. What is our potential liability? And do we have to investigate the complaint … ?

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Q. We hired a nonexempt part-time employee, but for several months she’s been working about 40 hours a week. Are we required by law to convert her to full-time status and offer benefits if she averages near 40 hours?

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Q. We’re a dermatology practice and one of our new em­­ployees is excessive with tanning. She has a dark tan and sometimes is sunburned. We promote the opposite of what she does. She also wears tight low-cut tops. Are we allowed to say something in both regards?

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Q. We have a couple of employees who get tardies for being late and their excuses have been that they’re in the bathroom due to a disability. So I follow them to the bathroom because I know they are lying. Am I breaking the law by following them? Is this considered harassment? It’s getting out of hand.

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Remember the heroes of last year’s World Series-winning San Francisco Giants team—Buster Posey, Tim Lincecum, Brian Wilson … Robin O’Conner. Don’t remember Ms. O’Connor? The Giants’ $80,000-a-year payroll manager must have played a pivotal role because she got a $1,513,836 bonus. In reality, federal autorities say O’Conner embezzled that money the player’s paychecks. How would your organization handle a suspected embezzler? Follow these four tips …

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Hoarding may get your employees a spot on reality TV, but it could damage the professional image of workers—and hurt their chances at a promotion, recent surveys say. If your employees (or you) are organizationally challenged, heed these tips from CareerBuilder and OfficeTeam …

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After a frustratingly bad pitching performance last week, hot-blooded Chicago Cubs pitcher Carlos Zambrano cleaned out his locker, told the staff he wanted to quit baseball and left before the game was over. The next day, Carlos apparently looked at his most recent paycheck and decided to un-resign. That begs the question: How would you handle an employee who tenders a resignation, then changes his or her mind the next day? Can you hold them to their words? …

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Jury Duty

by BMD Editors on August 16, 2011 10:08am

in Human Resources

Jury duty is a necessary and important civic service, and employers must have jury duty policies that delineate how they will handle such service. Both federal and state laws affect what employer jury duty policies say about how long employees may be absent, whether or not (and how much) they must be paid, and when a postponement can be a legitimate business need.

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The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) prohibits employers from discriminating against employees based on their own or their family members’ genetic information.  Specifically, employers cannot acquire genetic information, use such information to make employment decisions, disclose the information, or retaliate against employees who exercise their rights under the Act.

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An employee shows up for work, and appears to be in no condition to work. But is the employee in any condition to drive him/herself home? You should have a policy in place for handling this type of situation.

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