Admin Pro Forum

Share best-practices with your administrative peers. Pose a question, offer advice, or just be a fly on the wall.

Question: “I'm an older student, in an internship. I'm seeking advice on how to deal with immaturity in my fellow interns (they are in their 20s, I’m in my 50s).  I didn't realize they were ganging up on me until I was recently informed by another intern.  Also, they brown-nose the supervisor, while I'm more independent.  So, as I'm beginning to express anger at the interns' treatment of me, I'm looking like the difficult one.  Even if I believe there's some ageism involved, it won't make me popular with management to state this. How do I handle the situation? Can you recommend any books on baby boomer/Gen Y interaction?” — Anonymous

Question: “I'm an older student, in an internship. I'm seeking advice on how to deal with immaturity in my fellow interns (they are in their 20s, I’m in my 50s).  I didn't realize they were ganging up on me until I was recently informed by another intern.  Also, they brown-nose the supervisor, while I'm more independent.  So, as I'm beginning to express anger at the interns' treatment of me, I'm looking like the difficult one.  Even if I believe there's some ageism involved, it won't make me popular with management to state this. How do I handle the situation? Can you recommend any books on baby boomer/Gen Y interaction?” — Anonymous

Question: “My boss is somewhat disorganized, so I track requests sent to him and then meet with him every few days to make sure he hasn't let anything fall through the cracks. This takes a considerable amount of my time. I have become very disheartened the past few weeks because every time I go into his office he is playing solitaire! The company measures our success by department responsiveness. How should I approach him about how this affects our accomplishments? This reflects poorly on both of us.” — Anonymous

Question: “My boss is somewhat disorganized, so I track requests sent to him and then meet with him every few days to make sure he hasn't let anything fall through the cracks. This takes a considerable amount of my time. I have become very disheartened the past few weeks because every time I go into his office he is playing solitaire! The company measures our success by department responsiveness. How should I approach him about how this affects our accomplishments? This reflects poorly on both of us.” — Anonymous

Question: “I see so many letters today with the RE line directly below the inside address. I learned that anything below the inside address should pertain to the address. I also learned that anything pertaining to the body of the letter should be placed in the RE line, and it should be directly below the salutation. Have the rules changed?  Does the RE line now go under the inside address and above the salutation?” — Betty Dotseth

Question: “I see so many letters today with the RE line directly below the inside address. I learned that anything below the inside address should pertain to the address. I also learned that anything pertaining to the body of the letter should be placed in the RE line, and it should be directly below the salutation. Have the rules changed?  Does the RE line now go under the inside address and above the salutation?” — Betty Dotseth

Question: “Recently, my boss was signing paper letters and asked if it is still proper to write “Dear” in the salutation instead of just the person’s name. And for closing is "Sincerely" and "Very Truly Yours" passé or is “Regards” OK to use? Are handwritten or typed letters more formal than correspondence sent via e-mail?” — Naomi

Question: “Recently, my boss was signing paper letters and asked if it is still proper to write “Dear” in the salutation instead of just the person’s name. And for closing is "Sincerely" and "Very Truly Yours" passé or is “Regards” OK to use? Are handwritten or typed letters more formal than correspondence sent via e-mail?” — Naomi

Question: “I have a co-worker who is quite chatty.  Even if I am submerged in my work she will say, “I don’t mean to interrupt,” but she interrupts, and it is always something insignificant.  It is so bad that every time she walks by my desk she has to stop and talk, which is  several times a day.  I have told her many times that I can’t chat every time she comes by because I am busy and need to concentrate.  I have even told her that my boss might frown upon it if she thought I was frequently socializing instead of getting the work done.  Each time, she says she understands and apologizes, but then the next time I see her, she does it again.  I don’t have a private office, so I can’t just close a door.  How do I stop “Chatty Cathy”? — Anonymous

Question: “I have a co-worker who is quite chatty.  Even if I am submerged in my work she will say, “I don’t mean to interrupt,” but she interrupts, and it is always something insignificant.  It is so bad that every time she walks by my desk she has to stop and talk, which is  several times a day.  I have told her many times that I can’t chat every time she comes by because I am busy and need to concentrate.  I have even told her that my boss might frown upon it if she thought I was frequently socializing instead of getting the work done.  Each time, she says she understands and apologizes, but then the next time I see her, she does it again.  I don’t have a private office, so I can’t just close a door.  How do I stop “Chatty Cathy”? — Anonymous