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Is it time for a web site redesign? 5 telltale signs

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in Leaders & Managers,Management Training,Microsoft Office Training,Office Technology

Web sites don’t last forever. Some changes can be accomplished with simple maintenance, but patching can take you only so far.

Here are five signs that it’s time to revamp your site, according to the design strategists at elf design (elf-design.com) and FuelNet:

1. Your business has evolved. Has your business changed direction or grown significantly in recent years? Do you offer new products or services?

Consider how the changes to your business should be reflected in the structure, design and brand strategy of your site.

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2. Your site looks like it was designed in 1995. Some signs of an outdated site: chunky, slow-loading graphics; old-style “framed” coding, where the site is divided into panes that load separately; animated clip-art sprinkled throughout the site; and text created as images instead of in HTML. These flaws could reflect poorly on your business. It can make you look as though you don’t care enough about your business or about keeping abreast of technological advances.

3. The content isn’t user-friendly.
If you cringe when you read your site content, or if you regularly get questions from visitors about the copy, restructuring the information or rewriting it can help alleviate the problems.

If you’ve been adding content over time, the navigation may have become unwieldy or confusing. You want visitors to easily find their way around.

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4. You’re not getting good search engine results. Content that isn’t fully optimized for search engines leads to poor rankings, as does poor coding and design. Flash sites, for example, are more difficult to optimize for search engines. Poor rankings can be another effect of not coding in HTML.

5. The site isn’t bringing in inquiries or helping make sales.
If your site was designed long ago to act as an online brochure, it’s unlikely to attract a steady flow of prospects. To bring in more inquiries, your site should include calls to action, contact forms, an opt-in e-newsletter to keep in touch with customers, and downloadable articles that answer questions about your products or services.

 

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