Former Victoria’s Secret employee claims pregnancy bias

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in Employment Law,Human Resources,Maternity Leave Laws

A Beaumont-area Victoria’s Secret employee recently filed suit in Jefferson County District Court alleging she was discriminated against because of her pregnancy.

Krystal Burns brought her suit under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Pregnancy Discrimination Act and the Texas Labor Code. All prohibit discrimination and termination on the basis of pregnancy.

Burns was a co-manager when she became pregnant in 2007. She argued that her direct supervisor, Anna Abalos, forced Burns to work extra hours, despite a doctor’s note stating that she could not work more than 40 hours per week. Then, Burns said, she was fired for breaking a rule that others routinely got away with.

Burns alleged she was terminated after reporting shoplifters to mall security. According to Victoria’s Secret policy, employees must call the company’s loss mitigation department first. Burns, who claimed she was not aware of the policy, alleged that when employees who weren’t pregnant (including Abalos) violated the same policy, they kept their jobs.

Final note:
To make sure no one can claim ignorance, provide regular reviews of all employee policies. Regularly update the employee handbook to reflect any changes and provide either a written copy or an easy way to access the handbook online.
 

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