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Career audits: Does your job work for you?

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in Leaders & Managers,Management Training

Every year, you probably receive (or help write) your performance evaluation. But have you evaluated your job lately?

Workplace coach Joan Lloyd says that most workers go through some changes every year: a reorganization, downsizing, new management or simply a shift in duties.

Doing a “career audit” is a way of asking yourself: How is this new arrangement working for me?

Learn how to perform motivating and legally sound performance appraisals (training CD)

She suggests asking yourself these questions annually:

  1. What four things did I really enjoy in my job last year?

  2. What percentage of the total job do they represent?

  3. Are they the kinds of things that really motivate me?

  4. Will I have a chance to do more things like this in the future?

  5. Is it worth staying in this job for these kinds of experiences?

  6. What parts of my job do I really dislike?

  7. What do I dislike about them?

  8. Why do I dislike these activities? Who or what did they negatively affect? Why?

  9. Did they violate my beliefs, values or principles?

  10. What percentage of the total job do they represent?

  11. Did I have fun and enjoy going to work? Or did I hear myself saying things such as, “Well, at least it’s a paycheck.”

  12. Have I looked around the room during a meeting, or in my work area, and asked, “Do I want to be a part of this group?”

  13. Did I come home with stories that often began with, “You wouldn’t believe what happened at that horrible place today ...” How often?

  14. How many new things did I learn this year?

  15. Will the things I learned make me more marketable?

  16. Will what I learned last year build my credibility and skills?


Based on the list, think about ways you’d like to grow professionally in the coming year.

And what if your answers reveal you aren’t satisfied with the way your company or job is heading? As Lloyd writes in The Business Journal, “Maybe it’s time to exit this job and get back on track to more satisfaction and enjoyment in your work.” 

Learn how to perform motivating and legally sound performance appraisals (training CD)

Advice: Once you’re done auditing your own career, try to think of ways to judiciously share this process with others in your organization.

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