• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

HR Groups Rally Around Legislation to Create New Electronic Verification System

by on
in Employment Background Check,Employment Law,Hiring,HR Management,Human Resources,Leaders & Managers,Management Training

HR advocacy groups are applauding legislation introduced in Congress last week that would create a new mandatory electronic employment verification system. The New Employee Verification Act (H.R. 5515) would use an existing government database—one that is used to locate parents who fail to pay child support—to check the work eligibility status of new employees. It would replace the federal government’s soon-to-expire pilot program (E-Verify) that employers complain is slow and error-prone.

"With authorization for E-Verify scheduled to expire at the end of 2008, now is the time for Congress to establish a more advanced, reliable and effective employment verification system," said Susan Meisinger, president of the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).

The bill would introduce a new paperless Electronic Employment Verification System (EEVS). It would require employers to confirm the work eligibility of each new hire by entering the employee's identification data through their state's new-hire reporting program. Employers already use that electronic portal (the National Directory of New Hires, or NDNH) to facilitate child-support enforcement. 

Despite it being a mandatory system, only about 90% of employers send the required new-hire information to their state’s NDNH. One of the bill’s sponsors, Rep. Sam Johnson (R-Texas), says that if the bill becomes law, “The remaining 10 percent need to get on the bandwagon, which is much better than trying to require the whole gamut of employers to get on a new system.”

According to SHRM, the bill would also create the Secure Electronic Employment Verification System (SEEVS), which would require a new hire to undergo a standard background check to confirm identity, and then a “biometric” characteristic—such as a thumbprint—could be captured to further secure the employee’s identity. Employers would assume the cost of obtaining the biometric info in exchange for legal protection from employee lawsuits arising out of use of the identifying data.

In addition, the bill would:

  • Allow employers to attest electronically or telephonically that they have obtained and examined the required identity documentation.

  • Pre-empt state laws and protect employers and employees from state activity. 

  • Direct that an initial rejection of the employee’s work eligibility would become final if the employee doesn't contest the finding within 10 days, and require the employee to be terminated within three days. The bill would allow an employer to dismiss an employee if the worker doesn't obtain approval within 20 days after being notified of an initial rejection. 

The bill would introduce a new paperless Electronic Employment Verification System (EEVS). It would require employers to confirm the work eligibility of each new hire by entering the employees' identification data through their state's new-hire reporting program. Employers already use that electronic portal (the National Directory of New Hires, or NDNH) to enhance child-support enforcement. 

Despite it being a mandatory system, only about 90% of employers send the required new-hire information to their state’s NDNH. One of the bill’s sponsors, Rep. Sam Johnson (R-Texas) says that if the bill becomes law, “The remaining 10 percent need to get on the bandwagon, which is much better than trying to require the whole gamut of employers to get on a new system.”

According to SHRM, the bill would also create the Secure Electronic Employment Verification System (SEEVS), which would establish a system for a new hire to undergo a standard background check to confirm identity, and then a “biometric” characteristic—such as a thumbprint—could be captured to further secure the employ’s identity. Employers would assume the cost of obtaining the biometric info in exchange for legal protection from employee lawsuits arising out of the use of the identifying data.

In addition, the bill would:
  • Allow employers to attest electronically or telephonically that they have obtained and examined the required identity documentation.
  • Have pre-emption over state laws and would protect employers and employees from state activity.
  • Direct that an initial rejection of the employee’s work eligibility would become final if the employee doesn't contest the finding within 10 days, and require the employee to be terminated within three days. The bill would allow an employer to dismiss an employee if the worker doesn't obtain approval within 20 days after being notified of an initial rejection.

Like what you've read? ...Republish it and share great business tips!

Attention: Readers, Publishers, Editors, Bloggers, Media, Webmasters and more...

We believe great content should be read and passed around. After all, knowledge IS power. And good business can become great with the right information at their fingertips. If you'd like to share any of the insightful articles on BusinessManagementDaily.com, you may republish or syndicate it without charge.

The only thing we ask is that you keep the article exactly as it was written and formatted. You also need to include an attribution statement and link to the article.

" This information is proudly provided by Business Management Daily.com: http://www.businessmanagementdaily.com/4490/hr-groups-rally-around-legislation-to-create-new-electronic-verification-system "

Leave a Comment