Confidentiality conundrum: Can you reveal complaint in order to stop sexual harassment? — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily

Confidentiality conundrum: Can you reveal complaint in order to stop sexual harassment?

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in Discrimination and Harassment,Human Resources

What should you do when a male employee claims his co-workers are sexually harassing him? You can’t just ignore the complaint simply because it came from a man. But should you discuss the complaint with the co-workers and ask them to stop if they are engaging in harassment? Wouldn’t that make matters worse?

A recent 5th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling shows that you can and perhaps should involve the co-workers, even if that means risking that some of them will try to retaliate.

Recent case: Daniel, a married heterosexual registered nurse, worked in a pediatric intensive care department. He was one of two male nurses in a group of nine.

Over a period of about five months, Daniel claimed the female nurses harassed him with offensive remarks that were sexual in nature. He claimed his female co-workers joked about him having a homosexual relationship with another male nurse in the unit. For example, a female nurse allegedly mad...(register to read more)

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