How do you build a relationship with a reserved boss? — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily

How do you build a relationship with a reserved boss?

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Question: "I just got a new job assisting a regional manager who's more introverted than anyone I've ever worked with! She makes almost every request via email and shares almost nothing. I'm no extrovert myself, so I really have no idea how to go about getting to know her so we can work together better. Does anyone have any tips?"- Sam, Sales Assistant

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{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

Jackiel May 2, 2014 at 8:14 am

I was going to say the same thing as Maggie. Weekly “one-on-one meetings” have helped me get to know my boss better. He’s pretty introverted and we have almost nothing in common, but the weekly meetings do help. Remind him/her in each meeting that if they need any help with anything to let you know.

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Anita May 1, 2014 at 5:13 pm

I think it is just shyness , after all your bosses whole business life is like an open book to you. Yes keep constantly approaching them for things you need and make sure the meetings are kept short. Once you have the trust it solves a Lot of problems . Some people deal better when things are written down (via email )and maybe that is the way to go.

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Cathy May 1, 2014 at 4:51 pm

Sometimes it just takes time and being patient. (It took my boss a year to “warm up” to me being around.) I suggest that you just go about your job, smile when you see her, find an excuse to knock on her door and ask a quick question or double-check on an assignment . . . Ease into it and you’ll get comfortable with her and she’ll get comfortable enough with you to interact on a more face-to-face level.

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Maggie May 1, 2014 at 4:19 pm

I have supported a multitude of managers, from low level to executives. I have found that the best way to figure them out is to schedule a meeting for an hour. In this meeting, you should have a checklist of items you wish to discuss: email, calendaring, lunch breaks, pre-read, etc. Then, as a follow up, schedule 30min weekly meetings to touch base on projects any other deliverables that may be coming up in the next week or so.

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