Three goals for March

by on
in Leaders & Managers,Management Training

Quiz employees on how the business operates.

One of the best motivators is teaching workers at all levels how your employer makes money. When you “open the books” so that people understand how to read income statements and balance sheets, you foster a greater ap-preciation for the bottom line.

To spur such education—and have some fun—create a “term of the day” and quiz people on its definition. Examples include “gross profit,” “depreciation” or “fixed costs.”

Preface your questions to get richer responses.

Beware of asking employees a string of seemingly unrelated inquiries. Many people find it unnerving to face what seems like an interrogation filled with random questions.

In March, provide an overview of why you’re asking certain questions before you plunge in. Say, “If it’s all right with you, I’d like to learn more about your perceptions of our service.” Prefacing your line of inquiry with an explanation puts people at ease.

Ask for “top three needs” from sparring staffers.

Tired of two employees who don’t get along? Make March the month to bring them together. Ask each of them to write the top three things they want from the other.

After you review each submission to ensure all entries are tactfully worded, have the workers exchange lists. Then get each of them to commit to honoring one of the items for one month. When both parties seek to get their interests met, it raises the odds of mutual buy-in.

Leave a Comment