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Success and your personal vision

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in Leaders & Managers,Management Training

Ready to inspire greatness in your team? Leadership expert Mark Hopkins, author of Shortcut to Prosperity: 10 Entrepreneurial Habits and a Roadmap for an Exceptional Career, believes success starts with creating a personal vision. Here, he shares some thoughts with Managing People at Work’s Beth Braccio Hering:

MPAW: Why does having a personal vision make someone a better leader? 

Hopkins: People who have a personal vision know where they are going. They have a twinkle in their eye and a spring in their step. They are living with a purpose, and their daily progress toward their vision builds confidence and leads to a belief that anything is possible. 

MPAW: What are steps a manager can take right now to form a clearer personal vision? 

Hopkins: The best advice on how to develop a personal vision that I have come across is through a process called “creative tension,” a term coined by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Peter Senge in his work on learning organizations. Creative tension is a force that is at work in anyone who has taken the time to think deeply about the ideal life that he or she would like to live and compare it to a brutally honest assessment of his or her current reality—the life that the person is actually living. The juxtaposition of where you want to be when compared with where you are sets up a tension that pulls you forward. (This worksheet helps you outline your personal vision.)

You should also build a creative tension model for your group based on the current reality within your area of responsibility contrasted with a vision of the capabilities that would best support your group’s charter. Your strategic initiatives and team member objectives will flow from this model and turn heads within the larger organization. A group whose members are aligned with a common vision becomes highly motivated and highly effective.

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