How to approach your boss about a pay request

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in Your Office Coach

Question: Management keeps ignoring my request for a raise. During a performance review two years ago, I provided documentation of my expanded responsibilities and asked for a pay increase. Although my supervisor said she wasn’t sure if the job changes would justify a raise, she never clearly stated whether she supported my request or not. I sent her several follow-up emails, but got no response. Last year, I was transferred to another department. I sent my new supervisor an email requesting an increase, but he never replied.  Recently, I sent another email expressing disappointment in the complete lack of feedback about my previous requests. Again, no answer. Apparently, management won’t even take the time to officially reject my request.  This feels like a slap in the face.  How should I react?  Unacknowledged

Answer: I don’t know whether you deserve a raise, but I do know that your supervisors are being rude and unprofessional. If they believe your request is unrealistic, they should at least have the courtesy to share their reasoning.

However, your reliance on email is making it easier for them to ignore you.  Because electronic communication is so prevalent these days, people sometimes overlook the benefits of an old-fashioned conversation.  

If you actually talk with your supervisor, he will have to say something. He can hardly just sit there like a stone.  Then, if his response seems vague or noncommittal, you can immediately press for more specifics, which is better than trying to interpret an obscurely worded email reply.

You may have chosen to take the electronic route because pay discussions can feel awkward and uncomfortable.  And that’s precisely why your unresponsive supervisors have been trying to avoid the topic.

If you're not sure how to discuss pay with your boss, here are some tips: How to Ask for a Raise.

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

kanika September 12, 2012 at 4:56 am

i am studying in a college and i have a full part job. i need part time job. the manager say, “you will work full or you will quit the job. should i quit the job or no

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