Several local governments in Ohio legislate their own rules for employers within their jurisdictions. For example, several municipalities have living-wage laws stipulating higher pay than the state minimum wage ($6.85 per hour):

Lakewood: The city and companies entering into service contracts exceeding $25,000 with it or that receive at least $75,000 in loans, tax incentives or other assistance from Lakewood must pay employees $10.28 per hour with health benefits or $11.39 per hour if they don’t provide health insurance. For-profit companies with fewer than 20 employees and nonprofits with fewer than 50 employees are exempt from the ordinance.

Dayton: Any company providing services on a contract of at least $20,000 or that collects more than $30,000 per year from Dayton must pay its employees at least $10.25 per hour.

Cincinnati: Contractors and subcontractors working on city contracts of $20,000 or more must pay their workers $9.05 per hour if they provide health insurance or $10.60 per hour if they don’t.

Cleveland: All businesses receiving either contracts or assistance of $75,000 or more must pay at least $10 per hour. Subcontractors, lessees and tenants of contractors or direct-assistance recipients must pay the living wage as well. At least 40 percent of new hires must be Cleveland residents. For-profit companies with fewer than 20 employees and nonprofits with fewer than 50 employees are exempt from the ordinance.

Toledo: Contractors with at least 25 employees that do more than $10,000 worth of business with the city, as well as employers with more than 50 employees that receive more than $100,000 in economic assistance from Toledo must pay their workers 110 percent of the federal poverty level for a family of four if they provide health coverage, or 130 percent if they don’t. That translates to $10.57 per hour with health benefits or $12.50 per hour without benefits. Tenants of those receiving assistance must meet these wage levels as well.

Bans on sexual orientation discrimination

In addition, several Ohio cities have ordinances banning discrimination against gay, lesbian and transgender employees:

Cincinnati: All employers, regardless of size, may not discriminate based on sexual orientation. Fines for discrimination run up to $1,000 per violation.

Canton: Employers with four or more employees may not discriminate based on sexual orientation. Violators can be found guilty of a third-degree misdemeanor. 

Toledo: Employers with 12 or more employees may not discriminate against employees based on their sexual orientation. That’s a first-degree misdemeanor under city code.

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Excerpted from Ohio’s 10 Most Critical Employment Laws, a special bonus report available to subscribers of HR Specialist: Ohio Employment Law.

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