1-Minute Strategies: Feb. ’10

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in Office Management

Remain contactable by creating a Google Profile. Enter basic information about yourself, including contact information, so when users enter your name into a Google search, your profile shows up at the bottom of the page. Visit www.google.com/profiles.

Ask or you won’t get it. But if you do ask, you may be penalized. That’s the conclusion of one study at Carnegie Mellon University that showed both men and women are more likely to subtly penalize women who ask for more, the perception being that women who ask are “less nice.”

Success today goes to the “connectors” who actively seek relationships and then become “bridges” to other people, Rosabeth Moss Kanter writes on Harvard Business’s Change Master blog. “To be known is to be in the know. This is why connectors with big networks have so much power,” she writes.

Pose targeted questions about the specific behaviors that you want feedback on,
Mary Jo Asmus writes on Aspire-cs.com. Asking, “How did I do in that meeting?” generally isn’t enough to elicit good, actionable feedback. Besides, this is a question that can be answered with one word, like “good.” A general question will often yield general answers.

Boss wants Wi-Fi when he travels coach? American Airlines offers Wi-Fi on several dozen flights and plans to have it on more than 150 planes soon. Southwest Airlines is testing Wi-Fi on four planes and plans to add more service. United Airlines has plans to add it, as well.

Volunteer if you want to feel better about your life. Generally, people who say they volunteered in the past month—no matter what their age—experience a higher sense of personal well-being, according to a recent Gallup Poll.

Eliminate everything from the web page you’re reading,
except the text and photos, with Readability. It’s a free tool you install in your web browser by dragging its button onto your toolbar. No ads, no promotions — just a beautiful font (of your choice) at a size you choose. http://lab.arc90.com/experiments/readability/

What do women over age 40 want from their careers? According to a recent article in More magazine, 98% of women over 40 surveyed wanted to feel as if they were contributing positively through their careers; 73% wanted a flexible schedule; 89% wanted to work in an industry with a bright future.

Use these seven words more often:
“I don’t know, but I’ll find out.” No one has all the answers; a person who can speak with candor then follow through gains the trust and admiration of colleagues. Terry Starbucker writes on TerryStarbucker.com, “It’s candor with a promise attached—and a promise that gets fulfilled much more easily with right expectations in place.”

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