Put a positive spin on your writing

by on
in Workplace Communication

Which are you more likely to write: “Do not waste energy” or “Conserve energy”?

Too often, people express themselves negatively without even realizing it. If your writing contains a lot of “no’s” and “not’s,” it’s a signal of negative writing.

Using positive, self-assured, optimistic language is a better way to promote your ideas. In the above example, “Conserve energy” is more persuasive because it makes readers feel good rather than admonished.

Here are examples of negative sentences turned positive:

1. We hope you will not be disappointed with the results.

Positive: We hope you’ll be as pleased with the results as we are.

2. Without proper planning, we will not be able to prevent overcrowding.

Positive: We’re planning thoroughly in advance to keep the crowd to a manageable size.

3. If you don’t like my suggestions, please contact me.

Positive: Please contact me if you have any other suggestions. I’d welcome hearing them.

4. Don’t ignore details; they’re important.

Positive: If you can implement the plan down to the smallest details, you’ll realize better results.

5. This project is going to be nearly impossible to do.

Positive: I want this project to be successful, and to make sure it is, I need your help working around two potential roadblocks.

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