Intensity, teamwork took Belichick far — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily

Intensity, teamwork took Belichick far

Get PDF file

by on
in Leaders & Managers,Workplace Communication

New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick has won the Super Bowl three times despite working in a league structured to discourage football dynasties.

At least in part, he does it by:
  • Emphasizing teamwork and discouraging individualism. At Belichick's first Super Bowl, National Football League executives asked him if, according to tradition, he wanted to introduce his defensive or offensive team before the game. Belichick insisted on introducing both.

  • Harboring no interest in the trappings of success. On the sidelines, Belichick dresses like a “Sherpa guide,” late night TV host David Letterman jokes, and he drives a station wagon to his children’s games. For Belichick, the best thing about the Super Bowl is having beaten the best. It’s about the challenge, not the reward.

  • Refusing to waste time. Belichick's wife thinks he likes ice cream because he doesn’t have to spend time chewing it.

  • Learning, from a young age, not only what all the plays meant, but what the other coaches were thinking and what they intended to do. He’s particularly good at “tells”: tip-offs or unconscious signs from the other team.

  • Collecting vast amounts of information and using it to adapt his tactics to the other team. That pace of change is hard for most people to maintain.

  • Organizing himself meticulously. The way Belichick put it to a boyhood friend: The more organized you are, the more you know what you’re doing every moment, the less time you waste and the better you coach.

  • Focusing on what’s ahead. From the start, Belichick would study film and prepare a week ahead of the rest of the coaches. As soon as one game was over, he’d be ready for the next.

    What’s more, his offices display no trophies. It’s all about the future.
—Adapted from The Education of a Coach, David Halberstam, Hyperion.

Leave a Comment


Previous post:

Next post: