Drug/alcohol testing: FAQs

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in Centerpiece,Employment Law,Human Resources

When it comes to drug and alcohol testing, employers must balance the desire for a drug-free workplace with employees' privacy rights. So before implementing a drug testing policy, employers must address such issues as whether random drug testing is necessary, and legal; how a post-accident drug/alcohol testing policy must be structured; and whether it's legal to reject an applicant who won't submit to a pre-employment drug test.

FAQs about drug/alcohol testing

1. Who should pay the cost of drug and alcohol tests?

The company should pay the cost of any drug and alcohol tests that it requires or requests employees or applicants to take, including retesting of confirmed positive results. Any additional tests that the employee requests should be paid for by the employee.

2. Is it legal to refuse to hire an applicant who won't submit to a pre-employment drug test?

The controversy over drug testing involves random testi...(register to read more)

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{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

Alcohol Testing and Drug Testing Australia May 1, 2012 at 4:12 am

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Thank you for sharing.

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Pre screening And Drug Testing April 25, 2012 at 6:04 am

Well written post. Pre screening Drug testing is now very important part for every type of Industry. And it is available with good technology options, professional support networks and onsite drug testing. So thanks for sharing.

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George Norman January 18, 2012 at 5:41 am

I worked in a machine shop with about 75 employees for six years. They had the “Drug Free Workplace” policy. I knew about the policy, which used random test, but still chose to get high. I was never high at work but on my time, always. I figured my outstanding safety, attendance, and production record far outweighed the results of a drug test, if it ever came to that. I am now unemployed after failing a test that was given to me first thing on a Monday morning. My unemployment was denied, my bills are past due, and I am pissed. My state has passed laws making their own employees safe from random testing, but not the private sector. I guess my privacy isn’t as important as theirs. If my wages do not equal minimum wage X 168 hours, are they not in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act? No man can have a right to impose an unchosen obligation, an unrewarded duty or an involuntary servitude on another man. Not only is this a violation of my freedom, and privacy, but for all of them years I was not being paid for the time I still had the responsibility of following company policy. I say it’s time for America to focus on producing quality products that we can proudly sell worldwide and get people back to work. Lets quit trying to see how far our privacy and liberty can be limited or stripped away.

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