Keeping your job after a buyout

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in Your Office Coach

Question:  “I am the public relations director for a group of radio stations. Out of the clear blue, we were bought by a wealthy television entrepreneur who has no experience in radio. I immediately e-mailed him a brief overview of my background, to which he replied in a positive and professional way.  However, I’m concerned about my future. Can you offer any suggestions for enhancing my visibility and promoting my importance with the new owner?” — Newly Acquired

Marie’s Answer: Quickly making e-mail contact was a smart move. But since faceless people are easier to fire, you must now aim for a more personal connection. Here are some ideas:

•    Start by researching your new boss. An online search should provide immediate information about his background. Use your network of broadcasting contacts to get the inside scoop on his management style.

•    Familiarize yourself with norms and practices in the world of television, to understand his perspective. Managers always view a new organization through the lens of their prior experience. 

•    Demonstrate a helpful spirit by providing useful background information about the radio group. Present facts, figures and historical data in a concise, readable format.  

•    Meet with the new owner to discuss his goals for the business. Once you know where he’s trying to go, draft a plan showing how public relations can help him get there. 

Finally, accept the reality that things are going to change. People who react to new management by becoming critical and oppositional often are shocked to find themselves out on the street. To better understand your own reactions to change, see What's Your "Change Personality"?

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Mohan M Prasad February 3, 2010 at 2:24 am

Well, I would like you to examine two things
• What was your compulsion /need to take the initiative
• What response did you expect from him

I think the answers to these will address the concern that you are experiencing.

I also see a compelling need for you to be recognized and given the due important.

Not a bad idea at all.

However, when you carry out these intents into action (as you have done with the new owner), you also need to understand the risk factors.

• The Human Bias or the “Halo Effect “ which has it’s down side also
• Mail may be a good means of communication but is just not a substitute for personal interaction
• Besides you do not know if the other person lays importance to such unsolicited initiatives however well intended it could be

These are a few. However, having done this , the best thing to do is to wait and watch the developments at the office front and plan your strategy there from .

In your place and with the package of wants in my pocket, I would have spent more time in doing my home work on what type of management /owners they are and accordingly fashioned my approach.

You can still do it.

The good news is that he has responded in a positive and professional manner which should energize you in your endeavor.

All the best

Mohan M Prasad

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