• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

How do I compare my salary with co-workers’ salaries?

by on
in Admin Pro Forum

Question: “I have been in the same department for several years and would like to be sure that my salary is competitive with that of my colleagues who have recently joined the company.  These colleagues are in my department and have the same title as I do.  Any advice on a procedure for this? “ —  Emma

Comments

That topic will get you fired. Never approach or ask another co-worker their salary or benefits. No one appreciates to be asked that and the company will let you go. My suggestion is to do research like at salary.com where you can put your job description, location etc and get a detailed range of salary and benefits. I use that and it gives me pretty accurate results.

Discussion of salary is taboo and could get you fired! I agree with Jocelyn that you should do some rese...(register to read more)

To read the rest of this article you must first register with your email address.

Email Address:

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

John May 1, 2012 at 10:45 am

I emphatically disagree with the idea that we should not discuss our salaries with our coworkers. Let’s face it – the only reason companies want salaries to be a big secret is that people with power in companies take enormous amounts of money for themselves, then unfairly distribute the rest of the salary pool to the rest of the employees, based on very arbitrary reasons (i.e. not directly related to performance or value that one brings to the company).

So, talk openly about salaries in your company. Once everyone knows everyone else’s salaries, the people in power will become uncomfortable and feel compelled to even the playing field a bit. Remember, keeping salaries a secret is in the best interest of the few in power, NOT in the best interest of most employees. Sure, it will be upsetting to find out your coworkers are making much more/less than you, but that needs to be openly discussed before change can be made to create new policies that set salaries more evenly, based on more objective standards.

Reply

Leave a Comment