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PowerPoint secrets from Steve Jobs: Pictures trump words

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Avoid “death by PowerPoint” by stealing presentation tips from the famously charismatic CEO of Apple, Steve Jobs. Jobs is a gifted speaker, not necessarily because he was born with talent, but because he sticks to several strategies.

Carmine Gallo, communications coach and author of The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs, points out that Jobs uses presentation software as a tool to visually complement his stories.

“PowerPoint is a tool,” says Gallo. “Those who think it’s evil don’t know how to use it.”
Microsoft PowerPoint: Unleash Its Power and 'Wow' Features
For example, we know that information is more effectively delivered with pictures instead of words. So PowerPoint becomes a very effective tool for delivering new or abstract information.

Gallo explains, “When Jobs introduced the iPod in 2001, he said it would allow you to carry 1,000 songs in your pocket—the headline. And to show you just how small it was, he said, 'iPod is the size of a deck of cards.’ It’s been years since I saw that presentation but I remember what he said. Why? Because the slide showed a deck of cards. Pictures trump words.”

Remember: Less Is More

Thousands of people deliver PowerPoint presentations each day, and most could sharpen their message if the slides were less distracting. Here are some techniques and guidelines to do that:

Don't treat the slides as your script. For a 30-minute speech, aim for no more than 10 slides.

If the presentation must include a large web of information, create screens with a handful of navigation buttons that will take the speaker to different sections of material. By choosing different buttons, she can customize the presentation.

Practice restraint

Strive for no more than six lines of type on a single slide. Some presentation experts recommend 15 words or fewer per slide.

Limit not just the number of fonts in the presentation but also the type sizes. A good range: three type sizes. If you're sharing the presentation with other people, be sure to include the fonts by using the File/Save As dialog box.

Get more how-to tips with our PowerPoint training guide, written by Microsoft® Certified Trainer Melissa Esquibel. Learn more...
To keep the colors from being distracting, use only five or less per presentation.

Remember, a presentation isn't an action movie. If you're using transition effects, don't use every one available. Make them consistent.

One of the most effective techniques can be a "subliminal message." Under Animation Effects, choose "flash once."

To keep the file size down:
  • Don't use a higher resolution than you need. For a Windows screen, that's about 96 dpi. If you're printing the slides, you'll want at least 150 dpi, though.
  • Choose a smaller file format for graphics, such as JPEG rather than TIFF.
  • Ungroup and regroup objects such as graphics and embedded spreadsheets.
  • Don't allow Fast Saves, which can inflate the file size.
Other time-saving PowerPoint keystrokes:
  • [Number] Enter = takes you directly to that slide number.
  • B or Period = takes you to a black screen. Hit it again to resume
  • W or Comma = takes you to a white screen. Hit it again to resume.
Filled with colorful screenshots to help you see what you're doing, Microsoft PowerPoint: Unleash Its Power and 'Wow' Features allows you to learn at your own pace, and on your own schedule.

Teaching points include:
    book cover
  • Starting out in Word: You’ll learn how to start your PowerPoint project by creating an outline in Word. The Executive Summary contains tips for both Word 2003 and Word 2007.

  • Design and formatting: Melissa will show you how to quickly apply designs and formatting to create the look and feel you’d like for your presentation. If you begin your presentation in Word, you will be able to stay flexible with regard to design and formatting.

  • The magic of picture graphics and animation: Once your presentation is built, you’ll explore how to add and manipulate pictures and other graphic elements, and then how to apply animation.

 

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