Leadership Tips: Vol. 1010

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in Best-Practices Leadership,Leaders & Managers

Lead like Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg by seeing your mistakes as a growth opportunity. In one famous bungle, Facebook introduced its first news feed with a serious flaw. One member, Ben Parr, started a group called “Students against Facebook news feed,” and 750,000 users joined it within a week. Zuckerberg could have dug in his heels. Instead he sent Parr an e-mail asking for advice on how to better introduce new products—and developed an ally.

— Adapted from “Facebook’s leadership: Dissecting Mark Zuckerberg,” Joe Frontiera, The Washington Post.

Think ahead. Your career won’t be made or broken by the sudden impact of one event. It’s a series of slow changes over the course of decades. Lesson: Don’t worry about what happened yesterday. Focus on what happened 10 years ago. Think about what you can do today that will make an impact six months from now. The world may be getting faster, but slow shifts in processes and expectations are the ones that change our lives.

— Adapted from “Resilience and the incredible power of slow change,” Seth Godin, Seth’s blog.

“Avoid being a commodity,” says Eggland CEO Charles Lanktree, if you want to grow in a commodity business. Lanktree knew consumers liked eggs but wanted them to be more nutritious and lower in cholesterol. So he created healthier eggs, beginning with a healthier diet for egg-laying chickens. “Understand the perception, and change the reality,” he says. Now his better egg appears in magazines as one of the healthiest foods to eat.

— Adapted from “The Man Who Made a Chicken Egg Glamorous,” Robert Reiss, Forbes.


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