• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

Charlotte company learns the hard way: You will pay for bias

by on
in Discrimination and Harassment,Employment Law,Hiring,Human Resources

Junior Revels, age 76, has been a diesel mechanic for a long time. So long, in fact, that when he applied for a job at Southern Metals in Charlotte, the company flat out told him it had decided to hire someone younger.

Bad move. Revels filed a complaint with the EEOC, which found that, at the time the scrap-metal dealer told Revels of its decision, it hadn’t filled the position at all. When the company did hire a new diesel mechanic, he was much younger than Revels and had far less experience.

The EEOC sued and Southern Metals elected to settle instead of taking the matter to trial. The $10,000 it agreed to pay Revels was likely far less than a jury would have awarded him.

Under a 24-month consent decree, the company must post a notice of the settlement and immediately report any discrimination or retaliation complaints directly to the EEOC.

Note: It’s not the snow on the roof, it’s the fire in the furnace. Age discrimination laws make it clear that experience counts when it comes to hiring—something employers ignore at their peril.

Leave a Comment